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Tuesday, July 30th 2019, 8:49am

Irrigation drip/sweat line.

Guys when I had my sprinkler system installed I also had a drip line installed around the perimeter of the house primarily to help with the foundation. I just do not remember if the drip line is suppose to be right above the ground of if needs to be right below. Lately I notice some parts are below and some above. My question is do I need to bring the drip line that are below the ground up in order for it to work and avoid clogging the drip line?

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "jacobariel" (Jul 31st 2019, 11:10am)


2

Wednesday, July 31st 2019, 11:11am

Does anyone here know the answer to my question above?

mrfixit

Moderator

Posts: 2,418

Location: USA

3

Wednesday, July 31st 2019, 12:19pm

It depends on what kind of emitters you have. Can they clog? Or are they self cleaning?
From my point of view as a repairman, I totally dislike dripline that's underground. I like to be able to see it so I know if it's working or not.
These new desert landscapes that they've been installing in drought ridden California are a pain in the butt. The ground's hard as a rock and you can't see a thing. You'll know when they stop working when the plants turn brown.

I don't think your system was designed to be below ground because the initial install was above ground. But with that said, it might not matter a bit if it's above or below. Depends on the emitters.

4

Wednesday, August 7th 2019, 11:46am

It depends on what kind of emitters you have. Can they clog? Or are they self cleaning?
From my point of view as a repairman, I totally dislike dripline that's underground. I like to be able to see it so I know if it's working or not.
These new desert landscapes that they've been installing in drought ridden California are a pain in the butt. The ground's hard as a rock and you can't see a thing. You'll know when they stop working when the plants turn brown.

I don't think your system was designed to be below ground because the initial install was above ground. But with that said, it might not matter a bit if it's above or below. Depends on the emitters.
Thanks for your input. There is a part of the ground that does not get wet and that part is underground. I pulled it up and some areas are clogged because like you mentioned the dry soil. Should I cut and replace the part of the line that is clogged or is there a way to unclog it? Should I poke more holes?


Wet_Boots

Supreme Member

Posts: 5,338

Location: Metro NYC

5

Thursday, August 8th 2019, 7:38am

Find out what the existing line is, and buy another roll of the same. Patch up the installed line where needed. Or maybe replace the whole thing with the new emitter line (not buried)

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